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Monday Maths

Monday's Maths Challenges:

Ordering heaviest to lightest

 

Today’s Monday Maths challenge is to order some objects from your home from heaviest to lightest.

 

You could use every day objects, fruits and vegetables, toys or maybe objects from your garden.

 

We used toys.

 

 

First use your hands to hold each object to find which object is the heaviest.

 

 

 

Then put the heaviest object at the start of the line. Next find the next heaviest object by comparing objects. Hold two objects at a time, one in each hand. We did this with all of the objects until we got to the lightest object.

 

You could even make your own balance scales using a coat hanger and string like in this picture.

 

 

 

 

 

Don’t forget to share your pictures on Dojo.

 

 

Nature Shapes

This week we are looking for all of the different and exciting ways you can make shapes in nature. You can use sticks, flowers, mud, stones, and any thing else you can find to make your own shapes. Here are some pictures with lots of examples. Maybe you could challenge yourself and make some 3d shapes?

Representing Numbers. Pick a number between 1 and 10. Represent that number in as many different ways that you can think of. We used to do this in our maths lessons at school and for our maths homework, so you might remember it. You could write the numeral, draw pictures or collect objects. Be as creative as you like. Try and arrange your objects and drawings in different ways so you can see smaller numbers within bigger numbers. For example: in number 7, 3 is a part and 4 is a part.

Representing Numbers.  Pick a number between 1 and 10. Represent that number in as many different ways that you can think of. We used to do this in our maths lessons at school and for our maths homework, so you might remember it. You could write the numeral, draw pictures or collect objects. Be as creative as you like.  Try and arrange your objects and drawings in different ways so you can see smaller numbers within bigger numbers. For example: in number 7, 3 is a part and 4 is a part.  1

Subtraction Can you subtract a smaller single digit number from a larger single digit number? For example: 9 takeaway 3. Do this by using real objects. First count out 9 objects. Then take 3 objects away. How many are left? Another way of practicing subtraction. Subtraction skittles!

Subtraction  Can you subtract a smaller single digit number from a larger single digit number? For example: 9 takeaway 3. Do this by using real objects. First count out 9 objects. Then take 3 objects away. How many are left?  Another way of practicing subtraction. Subtraction skittles!  1

1 less Have a practice at saying the number that is 1 less than any number up to 20. For example: "What number is 1 less than 5?" If you're not sure make a numeral line from 1 - 20 to help you. Point to a numeral, to find one less move your finger onto the previous numeral.

1 less  Have a practice at saying the number that is 1 less than any number up to 20. For example: "What number is 1 less than 5?"   If you're not sure make a numeral line from 1 - 20 to help you. Point to a numeral, to find one less move your finger onto the previous numeral.  1

Understanding Time 

 

For our Monday Maths we are going to use every day language to talk about time such as 'before','after', 'next', 'then', 'later', 'morning', 'afternoon', 'lunchtime', '3 o clock'. 

When we are at school we follow our visual timetable each day so we know what will happen when. It has pictures so we can follow it easily. The pictures look a bit like this:

 

While you are at home you might have a different routine to the one at school but you will still have some things that you usually do, at different times of the day. Have a go at making your own timetable pictures. Cut out some squares of paper or card and draw or write (or both) something that you do each day on each square. So you might have 'brush teeth', 'eat lunch', 'reading', 'play with my toys', 'go to bed' and some other things. When you have made your cards have a go at putting them in the right order. What do you do first in the morning? What next? What do you do in the afternoon? What do you do before bedtime? You could even think about what time of day you normally do these things or check the clock when you are doing them and write down the time on each card.

 

When you have finished your timetable and put it in the right order, send us a photo if you can smiley

Measuring 

We are learning to use words This Maths Monday is a challenge for you to find out which room in your home is the longest! To measure each room we are going to use your feet! To do this grab one of your shoes and draw around it. I used an old magazine. Ask a grown up to help you draw around your shoe and cut it out twice, to make two footprints. 

 

      

 

Now have a look at each room you are going to measure. Which room do you think will be the longest? Which will be the shortest? How do you know?

"I think the kitchen is longer than the bathroom"

Use your footprint to measure each room. Lay one down, then the other and repeat across the length of the room. Try not to leave any gap between each footprint as you measure. For each room that you measure, write down or ask a grown up to write down the measurement. Which room was the longest? Shortest? Were your predictions right?

    

 

 

Addition

Can you add two single digit numbers together? For example: 5 add 3. Do this by using real objects. First count out 5 objects. Then count out 3 objects. Now push the two groups together. How many do you have all together? Using the "part, part, whole" sheet as pictured below can help. Just draw out your own circles. 
Picture 1
Picture 2

Another way of practicing addition. Remember use real objects. Count out the correct amount first. Then count how many all together. If you can try to hold the bigger number in your head. Then count on the smaller number. For example: 6 add 4. Hold 6 in your head, count on four.

Another way of practicing addition. Remember use real objects. Count out the correct amount first. Then count how many all together.  If you can try to hold the bigger number in your head. Then count on the smaller number. For example: 6 add 4. Hold 6 in your head, count on four.  1

A fun way of choosing numbers to add. Jess came up with this fun addition game. Jump on two numerals and add those numbers together!

A fun way of choosing numbers to add. Jess came up with this fun addition game. Jump on two numerals and add those numbers together!  1
Capacity

Can you play to explore capacity? Get some containers and use water, rice, pasta... etc to fill them. Talk about full, half full and empty whilst you play! If there are any capacity photos that you would like to share send to your class teacher. We can put them on Dojo or the website.

Previous Challenges: 
Numerals

Can you make your own numeral cards from 1 - 20. I made mine by cutting up an old cereal box and writing the numerals on. Once you've done this mix them up and see if you can put them in the right order. 
Picture 1
Patterns

Can you create your own pattern and describe it? Below is a pattern I made in my garden. I'll describe it for you: "1 stone, 2 daisies, 1 stone, 2 daisies..."

What patterns can you make? Can you describe them? Maybe you will find a pattern ready made in your home or garden.

If you send a picture of your patterns and your description to your class teacher they can put them on Dojo on your class story for your whole class to see! 
Picture 1
1 More

Have a practice at saying the number that is 1 more than any number up to 20. For example: "What number is 1 more than 7?"

If you're not sure make a numeral line from 1 - 20 to help you. Point to a numeral, to find one more move your finger onto the next numeral. 
Picture 1
Picture 2

Doubling

Doubling  1
Can you have a go at doubling? A fun way to way to learn your doubles is by double painting. Fold a piece of paper in half. Paint the number you want to double on one side of the paper. For example 3 dots. Then fold the paper and press down. Open the paper. What is double 3? The overall number of dots should tell you. 

Halving

Halving 1
Can you have a go at halving? Find 2 your favourite teddy's or toys. Then find something you have lots of like buttons, beads, chocolate drops etc... Can you halve them so that each teddy has the same amount. For example if you have 8 buttons and share them equally between your 2 teddies you will find half. What is half of 8?

Natural Maths

Natural Maths 1 Which stick is the longest?
Natural Maths 2 Estimate then count.
Natural Maths 3 Tally
Can you find some 2D shapes in your home? I looked in my house and found rectangles and circles. I wonder if any of you can find a square or triangle. Can you describe a 2D shape to a member of your family and ask them to guess what shape it is.
For instance "This shape has 4 straight sides, all of the sides are the same length, it has 4 corners. This shape looks like a face on a dice!"
Send us a picture of the 2D shapes you find and we can put them on the website for everyone to see! Send them to: helen.arnold@claremont.nottingham.sch.uk

Please note!!!

By sending us photos/pictures/videos of work or of your child you give us consent to put these on to the website. We will also be pairing this with a well done message containing your child's first name. If you do not wish for this to be put on the website please make this clear in your email or message to us. 

3D Shape Hunt

3D Shape Hunt 1
Can you find some 3D shapes in your home? I looked in my cupboards and found cuboids and cylinders. I wonder if any of you can find a sphere, pyramid or cube. Can you describe a 3D shape to a member of your family and ask them to guess what shape it is.
For instance "This shape has no vertices, it has 3 faces, 2 faces are circular and one face goes all the way around. This shape looks like a tin of baked beans!"
Send us a picture of the 3D shapes you find and we can put them on the website for everyone to see! 

Teddy Bear's Picnic

Teddy Bear's Picnic 1
Can you invite some of your toys to have a picnic? You'll need to count your toys or teddies to see how many cups, plates and spoons you'll need. We don't want any teddies left without a drink or food at the picnic! Do you need more of something? How many more? Do you need fewer cups? How many will you need to put away?

We'd love to see photos of your picnic, if you email them to me I can post them here on our website. Send them to: helen.arnold@claremont.nottingham.sch.uk 
Please note!!!

By sending us photos/pictures/videos of work or of your child you give us consent to put these on to the website. We will also be pairing this with a well done message containing your child's first name. If you do not wish for this to be put on the website please make this clear in your email or message to us. 
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